CategoryFuture of Work

25 Niche Job Boards For Your Next Search

2

I’m fascinated by the trend toward niche job boards. To me, it mimics the trend toward remote work. We used to work where the work was (near farms, near factories, near cities) With remote work, we can work wherever is best for us personally This is a similar path the job market (or talent acquisition market) is heading down. We used to have to go to newspapers, career centers, and big job boards...

20 Creative Twists On 40-Hour Work Week

2

Do you work a traditional 40-hour work week? Are you looking to inject some flexibility and creativity into your week? Wait, this is starting to sound like an infomercial. I wrote this article for people who are in this situation: The amount of hours you work each week feels about right But the pattern (when the work hours fall) is getting boring So you’re looking for alternative schedules...

30-Hour Work Week: 11 Unique Schedules To Try

3

What is a 30-hour work week? A 30-hour work week typically comes in one of two forms: 1) 6 hours of work per day for five days, or 2) 7.5 hours per day for four work days (also known as a four-day work week). If you had an assembly line of workers making cars (like Henry Ford had in 1926 when he designed the 40-hour work week), you’d notice hours are highly correlated to output. How many...

50-Hour Work Week: 16 Schedules To Peruse

5

What is a 50-hour work week? The most common 50-hour work week is five work days (Monday-Friday) with 10 hours of work per day (8:00 a.m.-6:00 p.m.). A common variation is to work fewer hours during the day and add a block of time at night or on a weekend day.   The five day, 40-hour work week is the standard. I’ll let you in on a little secret, though. Henry Ford invented that...

20-Hour Work Week: 12 Real Schedules To Try

2

What is a 20-hour work week? A 20-hour work week is often structured as five work days with four hours of work per day. An alternative format is to work 6-7 hours per day for three days per week. These are the types of people who work this schedule: 1) part-time employees, 2) freelancers or contractors, or 3) entrepreneurs who own their own businesses. In 1930, economist John Maynard Keynes...

The Pocket Dictionary For A Changing Workplace

T

It’s getting confusing out there in the workplace these days. A new term is invented every day – you’ll see it on TikTok or LinkedIn, then MorningBrew, then the Wall Street Journal – and you have to muster the energy to learn what it means. After all, you don’t want to be made fun of by a Gen Zer on Slack for not knowing what they mean by workcation, quiet quitting, or RTO. I...

What Is The Future Of The Office? (30 Predictions)

W

For decades, the office has been a mainstay of the workplace. While remote options have been available, they were few and far between; by and large, If you had a job, you went to work — period. That all changed during and after the pandemic. Companies worldwide learned that they could, after all, function just fine without requiring workers to come into the office. In many cases, workers were...

Future Of Work: 17 Rapid Fire Questions Answered

F

Click on a question below that interests you the most. What does “future of work” mean? What is the future of work? What are employees saying about the future of remote work? Is investing in your employees part of the future of work? What are executives saying about the future of hybrid work? What are the trends about the future of work? Is working from home or remote work the future of work? Is...

54 Future Of Work Predictions For 2030

5

The “future of work” is, admittedly, a catch-all term. When people say the phrase, I interpret it as a way to describe trends we’ll see over the coming decades in how goods and services are delivered. When it’s time to sit down to get some work done in 2030 or 2040, what will it be like? I wanted to hear what people thought the future of work would hold, so I asked our list of contributors for...

The Future Of Work Lies 12,000 Years Ago

T

We think we always move forward with technology. Often, technology allows us to cycle backward to our original preferences. Think about it: We had hieroglyphs ⇒ then written language ⇒ and we’re back to emojis. Aren’t emojis just digital hieroglyphs? Farming ⇒ factory food ⇒ organic Nomads ⇒ cities ⇒ digital nomads Our technology moves forward to allow our preferences to revert. With...