41 Mind-Blowing Remote Work Statistics

The adoption of remote work took an exponential leap forward as a result of pandemic lockdowns. Anyone who had the ability to work from home was either forced or recommended to do so. As you’ll read in the list of remote work statistics below, generally about 3% of the US working population worked from home before 2020. Now, ten times that (29% of respondents) would leave their job if it stopped offering remote work as a benefit.

And alas, people liked working remotely!

The dominos started to fall. The desire to work remotely permanently was so strong from employees, that many massive companies announced permanent remote plans. Others chose to adopt a hybrid work model (even though hybrid is not the future of work).

Before we get into the list of statistics, here are a few notes:

  1. I asked my list of contributors to share a crazy statistic they’ve heard recently about remote work. You can see who shared what underneath each statistic.
  2. You’ll notice that many of the statistics contradict one another. That seems normal to me. There could be sample size errors in the studies and, since the numbers have changed so quickly since 2020, there’s bound to be major variance. Take each with a grain of salt.

Let’s get to the numbers…

 

Remote Work Statistics: The Living List

I’ll update this list as I find new, compelling statistics. If you’d like to contribute a statistic (I’ll give you credit), please fill out the form at the bottom of the article.

 

“Remote work (27%) is now almost as much of a priority for job seekers as compensation (30%).”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“Recruiter.com’s Recruiter Index surveys talent acquisition professionals to find trends and insights into the current job market. Although you may think that compensation would always be the number one driver to a new position, remote work is close behind and we expect it to keep climbing. According to our October Index, 30 percent of employees valued compensation and 27 percent valued remote work. As the job market continues to change we expect to see the percentage of job seekers whose number one value is remote work increase.”

Thank you to Evan Sohn of Recruiter.com for sharing this remote work statistic.

See Also: We Studied 18 Remote Work Studies

“Remote workers are 40% more effective than their in-office counterparts.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“The statistic clearly shows that productivity increases when employers are more comfortable. Remote work offers comfort and allows workers to be closer to their families. Rather than reduce productivity levels, this increases it. By not seizing this opportunity, companies are leaving a lot of money on the table.”

Thank you to Ejike Umesi of Personality Hunt for sharing this remote work statistic.

“The average UK office worker is only productive for 2 hours and 53 minutes out of the working day.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“This helps promote the idea that you don’t need to be in an office for 8 hours (or more) each day and shows the value of hourly, contract-based work: clients can be assured that time charged to them is purely “execution focused” work that is adding value to their company and there isn’t any fluff or downtime. This makes for a strong value proposition and also allows remote workers to charge more because at the end of the day it will be far cheaper than hiring someone full-time, and often comes with more expertise.”

Thank you to Chris Reilly of Mission Capital, LLC for sharing this remote work statistic.

“44% of companies globally don’t allow remote work.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“It’s awesome to see that almost half of the world allows remote work, and less than half doesn’t. It’s understandable that some jobs can’t be done from home (i.e. frontline and essential workers), but the reality is that most jobs are easier done from home than others — this stat proves just that.”

Thank you to Rebekkah Smith of NorthOne for sharing this remote work statistic.

“58% of people want to be full-time remote post-pandemic. 39% want a hybrid work environment. That’s a mind-boggling 97% of the working force wanting to have some arrangement other than office-only.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“When talking about remote work, we all know that the whole space has changed so much since the start of the pandemic, but I still find it fascinating that a mind-boggling 97% of the working force wants to have some sort of hybrid remote work conditions. If someone asked most of those workers the same question before the pandemic, what do we think the numbers would show? It would be interesting to analyze. Remote work is here to stay and the impact it will have on various industries and the economy remains to be seen. But it’s obvious it’s gonna be significant (shifting different consumption patterns connected to spending more time at home and less on food, transport, work clothes etc.).”

Thank you to Klara Dumancic of Investors Club for sharing this remote work statistic.

“With the increase in the number of Americans working remotely, greenhouse gas emissions would reduce to the equivalent of removing 6,000,000 cars from the road.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“We already know that remote work can have a positive impact on employee’s mental and physical health, but it appears that it can also have a positive impact on the environment. I think reducing greenhouse gas emissions by this amount could sway businesses to keep the option open for employees who wish to remain remote.”

Thank you to Steven of Vigilante for sharing this remote work statistic.

“77% of people report being more productive working at home.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“This is an intriguing statistic that has the potential to change the way we see and approach remote work. If remote work can statistically improve our work productivity, it’s about time we start considering adopting on a larger scale. Personally, I struggled with productivity in the first few weeks, but once you pick up the pace and develop systems for yourself, it’s very easy to get started and stay productive when working from home.”

Thank you to Becky Brown of Shopping Kim for sharing this remote work statistic.

See Also: 49 Programs To Strengthen Remote Work Culture

“73% of all teams will have remote workers by 2028.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

” Remote work is certainly the work environment of the future, which is why all businesses should consider adopting some kind of remote work system. It’s a good idea to stock up on technology and adopt systems that will support the remote workforce of the future.”

Thank you to Andriy Shvets of MacKeeper for sharing this remote work statistic.

“23% of full-time employees are willing to take a pay cut of 10% if they were allowed to work from home instead of in the office.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“This is very useful information for business leaders, as it can lead to reduced expenses and, more importantly, happier workers.”

Thank you to Johannes Larsson of Financer.com for sharing this remote work statistic.

“Japan’s share of workers in remote work was 10% pre-COVID, managed to reach 30% in May 2020, but has since been wobbling around 20%.In the US, the rate was 44%.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“The stagnation in the remote work share can be attributed to the country’s paper-dependent operations, digitalization-averse tendency, presenteeism corporate culture, and lack of equipment and environment suitable for remote work.”

Thank you to Tim Sutton of CoffeeGeek TV for sharing this remote work statistic.

“62% of workers with a bachelor’s degree or higher worked remotely, either full-time or partially, before the pandemic struck, while only approximately 22% of individuals with a high school diploma held jobs that could allow them to work remotely.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“Systemic education inequalities and the resulting disparities in educational outcomes need to be addressed right now if we want to mitigate job losses in coming generations. Remote and hybrid working are the future of work, and resolving systemic educational inequalities urgently will help individuals secure dignified jobs in this new work order.”

Thank you to Patrick Crane of Love Sew UK for sharing this remote work statistic.

“29% of employees would quit their job if their employer didn’t allow them to continue working remotely post-pandemic.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“As an HR professional, I know how much our staff values a newly gained flexibility and an improved work-life balance that WFH offers. However, it was shocking to me that people are so motivated to switch jobs if their current employer wants them back at the office! It was also interesting that IT professionals are more likely than other employees to start looking for another job if their company doesn’t allow them to work from home (35% vs 29%).”

Thank you to Magda Klimkiewicz of Zety for sharing this remote work statistic.

“Remote work has shifted the work/break ratio for the most productive people. Top 10% most productive individuals now working in a 112/26 ratio (almost 2 hrs of work and half an hour of breaking) instead of the prior productive work/break ratio of 52/17, which is known as the 52-17 rule.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“Remote workers tend to compensate for not being at the office by working longer hours. Moreover, the blurred line between work and life adds an even bigger chance of working overtime when in a remote setting – not being able to fully disconnect from work due to working and living in the same space. Plus, remote workers often use their break time to deal with chores instead of relaxing as it would’ve been in the office. As a result, the breaks have turned from treats into more work, leading workers to become less productive because they are tired from all the other things they do during their workday at home. And so the cycle goes on – you’re less productive because you’re tired, you try to compensate for it with more hours, which in the long term can easily lead to remote work burnout.”

Thank you to Toms Blodnieks of DeskTime for sharing this remote work statistic.

“45% of Americans would either quit their job or immediately start a remote work job search if they were forced to return to their office full-time.”

“Almost one-quarter of the respondents said, specifically, they would quit if a return-to-office mandate was instituted.”

“74% of Americans need a continued remote working arrangement to stay at their current job.”

“64% of Americans believe companies that do not offer remote working arrangements will have to increase salary offerings to entice job seekers to apply.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“Workers almost always value flexibility over financial incentives in the workplace – especially during the pandemic. If you’re looking to attract and retain talent, make sure to map out and execute a remote working arrangement for your employees.”

Thank you to Mike Grossman of GoodHire for sharing this remote work statistic.

“98% of people would choose to work remotely, at least some of the time, for the rest of their careers.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“It’s pretty mind-blowing that nearly every single survey respondent is a proponent of remote work. Having the freedom to work from wherever you want can streamline your workflow and promote a far healthier work life balance. Even long after the pandemic, it’s surely here to stay.”

Thank you to Gregory Yong of Convincely for sharing this remote work statistic.

“88% of global companies offered remote work options to employees during the pandemic.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“Before the pandemic, remote work was considered irrelevant in corporate sectors. Times have changed, and it seems like remote work will only continue to grow in the coming years.”

Thank you to Elissa Bender of RevenueGeeks for sharing this remote work statistic.

“72% of employees prefer a hybrid remote-office model, with only 13% preferring always working from home if given a choice.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“The statistic is a direct indication that employees don’t want to work from home on a permanent basis. This is surprising because WFH offers so many benefits to both employers and employees. The challenges that companies were facing in implementing remote work have all been solved, and all employees working from a remote location have a smooth work experience. Despite all this, employees still want to return to the office in a hybrid setting. I would attribute this to a loss of personal connection and interaction between coworkers.”

Thank you to Steve Anevski of Up Shift Work for sharing this remote work statistic.

“76% of entrepreneurs think remote work will be the ‘new normal.’”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“I agree with 76% of entrepreneurs that remote work is not a temporary fix. Many organizations have adapted to it, as the workflow is not interrupted due to technological advancements. Nonetheless, it saves money on renting or leasing office spaces. It is beneficial not only for employers but employees as well. They can save money on the commute.”

Thank you to Dave Ericksen of Waterzen for sharing this remote work statistic.

“There could be over one billion location-independent workers by 2035.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“I believe that it is quite possible for remote work to increase this drastically. The pandemic has proven to us that many tasks can be done from home. With programs such as Microsoft Teams, Zoom, and Slack, communication won’t be a problem at all. Employers can also use programs like Hubstaff to track their employees’ productivity rates. Going remote is also beneficial for companies as they can save a lot of money. No longer do they have to spend money on office maintenance and utilities. So, many companies (especially small businesses) would prefer to go remote. Moreover, organizations are now being more inclusive. Remote work means that companies can hire employees from anywhere in the world. Not only does it increase diversity, but it also increases the talent pool. People are also looking for more freedom and flexibility at their workplaces. Remote work allows individuals to travel to different places without hindering their work lives. All they need is a stable internet connection. The flexibility that comes with remote work means that individuals can focus on their mental health and have a balanced work and personal life. Now, who wouldn’t want that?”

Thank you to Daniel Carter of Office Furniture Online for sharing this remote work statistic.

“84% of employees shared that working remotely after the pandemic would make them happier, with some even willing to take a pay cut.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“As a founder and CEO of a remote-first company, it is evident that working remotely gives more freedom and increases productivity amongst my employees. Many who joined us from an in-person office setup shared that they would never go back after experiencing the benefits of remote work. Coming to the pay cuts, it makes a lot of sense for one to opt for it as remote work will give them the time and mind-space required to have a better work life balance or even to start a side hustle, which any employer should support provided it doesn’t affect one’s performance and productivity at work.”

Thank you to Phil Strazzulla of SelectSoftware Reviews for sharing this remote work statistic.

“29% of people would be willing to quit and change employer if they weren’t permitted to continue working from home.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“It’s growing increasingly clear that employees are willing to”vote with their feet”if companies won’t be reasonable about requests to work remotely. Firms risk losing their best talent if force people to be office-based when it’s not truly required.”

Thank you to Ben Taylor of HomeWorkingClub.com for sharing this remote work statistic.

“Remote workers are 22% happier than those who work on-site.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“It is essential to keep track of your employees well-being because this significantly affects their performance. I am glad to know that being with their loved ones as we face these trying times provides them better support in all aspects and allows them to work efficiently. When everything goes back to normal, companies must strive to foster a better work environment for their employees. This aids in their productivity and help us curb losing them during the great resignation period. I am an advocate of a healthy work-life balance, and this statistic made me realize that there are still things I could improve on as an employer. With that said, it is always best to see things from a different perspective because it will be a win-win situation on both ends at the end of the day.”

Thank you to Baidhurya Mani of Sell Courses Online for sharing this remote work statistic.

“4.7 Million US employees work remotely at least 50% of the time.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“While work from home may seem like a recent adoption, it has been around for quite some time. Around 3.4% of the total US workforce works remotely at least 50% of the time. These numbers reflect a significant change in work practices that have been building up for quite some time.”

Thank you to Dan Skaggs of One Thing Marketing for sharing this remote work statistic.

“A telling result of the survey we ran amongst those who started working remotely since the onset of the pandemic was that 91% of those who received swag felt effectively welcomed to their new company.”

“A variety of activities are received well by new employees, including virtual happy hours, trivia games, and a buddy system at 86.5%, 88%, and nearly 89% respectively.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“It is very important to actively engage with your remote employees. Simply setting up a mentorship program or buddy system greatly increases their personal feelings towards being a part of the company and is worth implementing sooner rather than later.”

Thank you to Jason Miller of Promoleaf for sharing this remote work statistic.

“75% of U.S. workers have some degree of past remote work experience.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“For nearly two years, the COVID-19 pandemic pushed remote work to the forefront of conversations about the U.S. job market, so it may come as a surprise that three-quarters of the U.S. labor force has already worked from home at some point in their careers. This statistic speaks to the reality of remote work enthusiasm: it isn’t new, but it is growing. In fact, telecommuting has been a long-standing work arrangement throughout industries like technology, sales, project management, government, and administration.”

Thank you to Kimberly Back of Virtual Vocations for sharing this remote work statistic.

“By the end of 2021, 51% of all knowledge workers worldwide are expected to be working remotely, up from 27% of knowledge workers in 2019.”

“Remote workers will represent 32% of all employees worldwide by the end of the year, up from 17% of employees in 2019.”

“In 2022, 31% of all workers worldwide will be remote using a mix of hybrid and fully remote. It said the US will lead in terms of remote workers in 2022, accounting for 53% of the US workforce.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“These findings show us the ability for companies to shift to remote work at a large scale. One thing is certain, remote work is here to stay and growing a strong trend. Also, ‘knowledge workers’ with high skill, are expected to go even more remote, in comparison with other segments. While there still exists big differences in these sectors throughout different countries.”

Thank you to Nikita Chen of LegitGrails for sharing this remote work statistic.

“76% of people have gained weight since the start of the pandemic.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“I believe the weight gain can be chalked up to the quarantine, gyms closing, and most notably, the switch to remote work. You simply don’t have to walk as far if you’re going from your bed to your home office. Add to that the proximity of the snack cabinet, and it’s really a recipe for disaster!”

Thank you to Bret Bonnet of Quali for sharing this remote work statistic.

“99% of people want to work remotely at least once in their life.”

(Source)

The takeaway for remote work:

“This statistic shows that there is a way bigger population interested to work remotely than most would assume. I think this is a great insight for companies to have when it comes to planning their logistics. Companies who offer this setup appeal more to workers because of convenience and flexibility, among any other reasons on why people prefer remote working.””

Thank you to Brogan Renshaw of Modelers Central for sharing this remote work statistic.

Only 20-25% of companies pay or share the cost of home office equipment, furniture, cable, chair.

(Source)

 

People who work remotely at least once per month are 24% more likely to be happy and productive.

(Source)

94% of employers say that productivity either remained the same or increased with implementation of remote work.

(Source)

83% of employers state that working remotely has proven successful for their company.

(Source)

86% of respondents believe remote work is the future.

(Source)

37% of jobs in the United States can be performed entirely at home.

(Source)

42% of remote workers feel they’re just as connected with colleagues as if they were working on-premises, and 10% feel even more connected.

(Source)

 

Want to add a remote work statistic?

Like all of our articles, we view them as living resources. We want to update wherever we are missing something or have outdated information. Did you recently come across an insightful statistic about remote work? Please share it below. We’ll give you credit in exchange for the suggestion.

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About the author

Henry

Henry is the founder of Buildremote.

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